Wilkes University

Sport Psychology Minor

Sport Psychology Minor

The sport psychology minor at Wilkes University will provide you with a unique opportunity to learn psychological performance enhancement techniques while also exploring how individuals can perform at peak skill levels in athletics.

Coursework will address common issues faced by athletes in all sports. These include anxiety, stress and anger management, as well as drug and alcohol abuse and relationship difficulties.

As a sport psychology minor, you will take 22 credits, including these core courses:

PSY-101 – General Psychology
PSY-242 – Personality
PSY-266 – Peak Performance Coaching
PSY-352 – Abnormal Psychology
PSY-402 – Field Experience in Sport Psychology
SM-261 – Sport Psychology

SOC-261 / EC-298 – The Sociology of Sports/ The Economics of Sports, SM-201 – Intro to Sports Management, PSY-353 Clinical Methods in Psychology, or PSY-399 Cooperative Education

Note: SM-261, PSY-399, and PSY-402 must be taken in sequence and cannot be taken concurrently.

 

Recommended Course Sequence

Sports Psychology Coursework Sequence

First Semester
PSY-101 - General Psychology
Major Requirements
General Education Requirements

Second Semester
SM-261 - Sport Psychology
Major Requirements
General Education Requirements

Third Semester
PSY-266 - Peak Performance Coaching
Major Requirements
General Education Requirements

Fourth Semester
PSY-242 - Personality
Major Requirements
General Education Requirements

Fifth Semester
PSY-352 - Abnormal Psychology
Major Requirements
General Education Requirements

Sixth Semester
SOC-261 The Sociology of Sports / The Economics of Sports, SM-201 - Intro. to Sports Management,
PSY-353 - Clinical Methods in Psychology, or PSY-399 - Cooperative Education (Choose One).
Major Requirements
General Education Requirements

Seventh Semester
PSY-402 - Field Experience in Sport Psychology
Major Requirements
General Education Requirements

Eighth Semester
Elective
Major Requirements
General Education Requirements

Psychology

PSY-101. General Psychology

Credits: 3

An introduction to the field of psychology with emphasis on objective and systematic methods of inquiry. Extensive survey of major psychological topics including: biological basis of behavior, sensory systems, learning, cognition, emotions, consciousness, development, stress, personality, social factors and mental health.

PSY-200. Statistics

Credits: 4

An introduction to the use of statistical procedures (by hand and with SPSS) in the analysis of psychological data. Topics include descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. Techniques such as t-tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression will be used for hypothesis testing. It is recommended that students take this course at the end of their sophomore or their junior year. Psychology and Neuroscience majors must earn a 2.0 or higher in this course.

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101 and Math competency (MTH 101 or higher).

PSY-221. Developmental Psychology

Credits: 3

The course provides a general view of human growth and development from conception through the life span. Physical, cognitive, personal, and social development of the various stages of life will be presented. Discussions will include issues such as the influence of heredity versus environment and how these issues can be studied using various developmental research techniques.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-222. Adolescent Psychology

Credits: 3

This course is designed as a study of the adolescent stage of life. Emphasis will be placed on the following areas of development: physical; emotional; cognitive; and social.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-242. Personality

Credits: 3

An examination of the major theoretical perspectives on personality development and functioning, with additional emphasis on the assessment of personality and research in personality.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-250. Applied Behavior Analysis

Credits: 3

This course will explore the dynamics and management of human behavior. As such, the course will involve exercises with empirical research, statistics, literature searches and analysis with emphasis on the principles emanating from Operant and Pavlovian conditioning phenomena.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-257. Neuropsychology

Credits: 3

A survey of the relationship between nervous system physiology and human behavior with emphasis on neurological disorders, neuropsychological assessment, head injury, cerebral asymmetry, and rehabilitation.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-264. Positive Psychology

Credits: 3
Positive Psychology encompasses psychological theory and research about what makes our lives satisfying, purposeful, and "worth living", as well as what creates happiness and well-being.  Students will examine the major theories and concepts of the field of positive psychology, and will engage in a variety of empirically-supported interventions designed to help them reach their fullest potential, improve overall quality of life, and enhance psychological well-being.

PSY-266. Peak Performance Coaching

Credits: 3

Peak Performance Coaching is a field of study and application with the aim of helping individuals reach their optimal level of performance.   Students will learn and use multiple methods that can help clients with the process of setting and reaching goals.  This course surveys and applies approaches such as Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) and Life Coaching, employing techniques from these disciplines.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-300. Research Methods

Credits: 4

A lecture and laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with the methods of psychological research. Hands-on experimental participation will give the student direct experience with research design and statistical analyses using SPSS. The student will prepare a formal APA style research proposal to be used for the capstone experience.

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Pre-Requisites
PSY-101 and PSY-200. Students must have earned a 2.0 or higher in PSY-200. To be taken by Psychology or Neuroscience majors only, during the junior or senior year.

PSY-301. Psychological Research

Credits: 3

An introduction to how psychological research methods and statistics are used in academic journals and the popular media. The following topics will be discussed: scientific method, research methods used to gather evidence, descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing. Students will be asked to critically review and evaluate research findings.

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101 and PSY-200. Students must have earned a 2.0 or higher in PSY-200. To be taken by Psychology majors only, during the junior or senior year.

PSY-309. Career Mentoring for the Social Sciences

Credits: 2

This course will offer career guidance for students in the Behavioral and Social Sciences. The course will include topics such as mentoring, networking, résumés and interviewing skills.

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101, junior standing. Course will be cross-listed with PS and SOC-309 Course credits will not count towards minor credits. Open only to majors in the Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSY-311. Behavioral Neuroscience

Credits: 4

A study of the physiological mechanisms mediating behavior and cognition. Emphasis on the structure and function of the nervous system and the neurophysiological bases of sensory processes, emotion, abnormal behavior, sleep, learning and memory, pain, and drug abuse. Laboratory experience includes brain dissection and psychophysiological techniques employed in human behavioral neuroscience research.

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Pre-Requisites
PSY-101; junior or senior standing.

PSY-331. Cognition

Credits: 3

A survey of human cognitive processes such as attention, pattern recognition, memory, language, and problem solving as well as other selected aspects of human cognition. The course includes historical as well as current perspectives on cognitive issues and emphasis on the research techniques used.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-333. Critical Thinking in Psychological Science

Credits: 3

This course provides an opportunity to learn and practice the basic skills of critical thinking within the context of psychological science. Students will evaluate claims and theories in psychology, generate alternative explanations of psychological findings, identify common fallacies in thinking, construct and evaluate arguments, and learn how to become a more intelligent consumer of information. Additional topics include the interface of politics and the media with science and the dangers of pseudoscience.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-341. Introduction to Social Psychology

Credits: 3

An introduction to the study of social behavior from a psychological perspective. Topics include attitude formation and change, conformity, leadership, culture, gender and sexuality, prejudice and discrimination. Cross listed with SOC-341.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-351. Behavioral Medicine

Credits: 3

This course provides a survey of the basic theoretical concepts and major issues in Behavioral Medicine. Specifically, this course examines how the areas of health, illness, and medicine can be studied from a psychological perspective. Topics of emphasis include the following: the psychological aspects of wellness and illness; preventive medicine; stress; chronic and terminal diseases (such as cancer and AIDS); and the use of alternative medicine.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-352. Abnormal Behavior

Credits: 3

A general survey of psychological disorders in children and adults with emphasis on symptomatology, etiology, and assessment. Forensic and classification issues are also examined.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-353. Clinical Methods in Psychology

Credits: 3

A survey of the clinical methods in psychology including general therapeutic models and specific clinical techniques. Issues of assessment and diagnosis of psychological disorders are examined.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-354. The Exceptional Individual

Credits: 3

A study of the psychological, physical, and social challenges and needs of exceptional individuals with an emphasis on etiology, assessment, impact, and educational interventions.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-355. Forensic Psychology

Credits: 3

A survey of the role that psychology has played in the legal system from issues of morality and theories of crime, to eyewitness testimony, the evaluation of criminal suspects, and jury selection. The application of the methods and theories of psychology to the legal system will be emphasized.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-356. Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Credits: 3

A survey of the applied areas of personnel, organizational, human factors, and consumer psychology.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-358. Psychological Tests and Measures

Credits: 3

A survey of the psychometric properties of various instruments and measures of psychological phenomena (especially intelligence and personality). A variety of group and individual tests are studied as to their reliability, validity, and utility.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-359. Psychopharmacology

Credits: 3

A study of the effects and mechanisms of the action of psychoactive drugs on behavior. Focus will be placed on drugs used to treat psychopathological disorders and drugs of abuse. Topics of emphasis include a survey or stimulants, depressants, antipsychotics, antidepressants, psychedelics, and legal drugs, such as caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-362. History of Psychology

Credits: 3

A study of the philosophic and scientific roots of contemporary psychology, with emphasis on the applicability of past questions and knowledge to current psychological thought.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-399. Cooperative Education

Credits: 1-3

Professional cooperative education placement in a private or public organization related to the student’s academic objectives and career goals. In addition to their work experience, students are required to submit weekly reaction papers and an academic project to a Faculty Coordinator in the student’s discipline. (See the Cooperative Education section of this bulletin for placement procedures.)

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Pre-Requisites
Sophomore standing, minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA, consent of academic advisor, and approval of placement by the department chairperson.

PSY-400. Research Capstone

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide a research-based capstone experience for senior Psychology majors. Students will run an experiment, conduct the appropriate statistical analysis, and present the results formally in an APA manuscript, a poster, and in an oral presentation.

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Pre-Requisites
PSY-101; PSY-200; PSY-300; Senior status and departmental permission.

PSY-401. Applied Capstone

Credits: 4

This course will offer a professional capstone experience, including a required internship experience. Students will prepare client case presentations based upon their observations during their internship. An internship is required prior to taking PSY 401 (PSY 399) and a second internship is required for this course, which is counted with the four credit requirement.

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Pre-Requisites
PSY-101; PSY-200; PSY-301; PSY-399; Senior status.

PSY-402. Field Experience in Sport Psychology

Credits: 4
Students will be enrolled in an athletic internship and participate in a seminar format class.  Class time will be devoted to examining research related to issues faced by athletes and how psychological variables can be used to improve performance.

Sociology

SOC-101. Introduction to Sociology

Credits: 3

A systematic view of sociology, providing essentials for an approach to questions about man in society; analysis of social processes, structures, and functions.

SOC-201. Introduction to Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the American criminal justice system, with a focus on the interconnectedness of the major pieces: the police, the courts, and the correctional system. Benefits and limitations of the existing criminal justice system will be explored, along with growing threats to both society and the system itself.

SOC-211. The Family

Credits: 3

History and ethnological studies of family. Role of family in the development of the individual. Interrelation of church, state, and family. Social conditions and changes affecting the American family. Family stability and disorganization.

Pre-Requisites
ANT-101 or 102, SOC-101, or approval of the instructor.

SOC-212. Human Sexuality

Credits: 3

A balanced and thoughtful introduction to what is currently known about human sexuality. Research in sexuality comes from a variety of disciplines, including Psychology, Sociology, Biology, Medicine, Physical Education, and Human Education. Without assuming that the student has an extensive background in any of these fields, this course draws liberally on all of them and works hard to show how the biology, psychology, and sociology of sex are interrelated.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-214. Sex Roles

Credits: 3

This course deals with the origins of sex roles, the historical changes in sex roles, the consequences of sex roles to the individual and to society, and the outlook for sex roles in the future.

Pre-Requisites
ANT-101 or 102, SOC-101, or approval of the instructor.

SOC-215. Family Violence

Credits: 3

It is customary to think of violence between family members as infrequent and, when it does occur, as being the result of some mental defect or aberration. Research evidence shows that neither of these views is correct. This course examines the prevalence, experience, causes, and prevention of family violence.

Pre-Requisites
ANT-101 or ANT-102, SOC-101, or approval of the instructor.

SOC-220. Violence In Society

Credits: 3

An overview of the causes, correlates, and history of violence in American society.  Topics include the relationship between guns and gun control and violence, violence and popular culture, drug-related violence, and the development of organized crime and gangs in the United States.

Pre-Requisites

SOC-222. Criminology

Credits: 3

An analysis of the nature and extent of crime and the causes and prevention of criminality. Topic areas include the history of criminology, criminological research methods, the extent and patterns of crime, theories of criminal behavior, and current issues surrounding crime in the U.S. today.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-223. Drugs and Alcohol in American Society

Credits: 3

An examination of drugs and alcohol in American society as a major social problem. 

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-226. Corrections, Probation and Parole

Credits: 3

A study of the agencies devoted to the correction and treatment of convicted offenders with a special focus on adult and juvenile probation, parole agencies supervising offenders in the community, as well as residential correction facilities, including jails, prisons, and juvenile institutions.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-228. Deviance and Social Control

Credits: 3

This course examines the nature of deviant behavior and the social responses to it. Topics covered include the following: what constitutes deviance; theories of deviance; varieties of deviant behavior; and the types of societal responses to deviant behavior.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-231. Fields of Social Work

Credits: 3

A survey of the main problems of social work and of agencies and methods that have developed to cope with them. The nature and requirements of the different fields of social work.

Pre-Requisites
ANT-101 or 102, PSY-101, SOC-101, or approval of the instructor.

SOC-234. Group Counseling

Credits: 3

Students enrolled in this course will learn about different types of group counseling services. Students will acquire knowledge of group practice issues for each phase in the evolution of groups. Students will develop initial competence in beginning work as a group leader or facilitator.

Pre-Requisites

SOC-235. Corrections Counseling

Credits: 3

Interviewing and intervention strategies in dealing with the criminal offender population in both prison and community settings, as well as the social services available for this population.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-236. Individual Counseling

Credits: 3

Students enrolled in this course will gain knowledge of the counseling process, including values, goals, methods, and limitations. Students will learn about various client characteristics that impact the counseling relationship. Students will develop initial competence in delivering counseling services.

Pre-Requisites

SOC-251. Sociology of Minorities

Credits: 3

A theoretical analysis of inter-group tensions and processes of adjustment with special reference to modern racial, national, and religious conflicts, both domestic and abroad.

Pre-Requisites
ANT-101 or 102, SOC-101, or approval of the instructor.

SOC-252. Race, Class, Gender and Crime

Credits: 3

An examination of the relationship between social structure and crime, with an emphasis on developing and applying a critical perspective. Topics include the relationship between immigration and crime, the role of protests both contemporary and historically in shaping our attitudes about crime, the ways that socialization impacts criminality across race/class/gender boundaries, and ways in which the system can be improved.

Pre-Requisites

SOC-261. Sociology of Sport

Credits: 3

An examination of sport from a social and cultural perspective. Emphasis is placed on examining how the institution of sport is a microcosm of American society, reflecting society’s major cultural beliefs, and how the organization of sport reflects that of society. 

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-263. The Urban Environment

Credits: 3

Cross-listed with PS-212. See description under the Political Science course listings.

SOC-309. Career Mentoring in the Social Sciences

Credits: 2

This course will offer career guidance for students in the Behavioral and Social Sciences. The course will include topics such as mentoring, networking, résumés and interviewing skills.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101, junior standing. Course will be cross-listed with PS and PSY-309

SOC-325. Juvenile Delinquency

Credits: 3

An examination of the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency, its causes, and its prevention. Topics include the similarities and differences between juvenile and adult justice systems, trends in juvenile delinquency, theories of delinquency, gangs, and the roles of family, schools, and legal institutions.

Pre-Requisites

SOC-341. Introduction to Social Psychology

Credits: 3

A general survey of the field of social psychology. Social factors in human nature, psychology of individual differences, social interaction, collective behavior, psychology of personality, and social pathology. Cross listed with PSY-341.

Pre-Requisites
ANT-101 or 102, PSY-101, SOC-101, or approval of the instructor.

SOC-352. Social Stratification

Credits: 3

A survey of the structure and dynamics of social inequality in American life. Attention is focused on the institutionalization of power arrangements that perpetuate intergenerational patterns of economic, political, and prestige inequalities among collectivities. A special effort is made to compare the consequences of structured social inequality for the very wealthy and the very poor.

Pre-Requisites
ANT-101 or 102, SOC-101, or approval of the instructor.

SOC-360. White Collar Crime

Credits: 3

A broad introduction to the theoretical and practical concerns that arise in the study of white collar crime and other forms of deviance conducted by the upper class in a capitalist society. Theoretical aspects of governments and organizations are examined to further understand the damage to society caused by white collar crime.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-222 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-370. Quantitative Reasoning for the Social Sciences

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to quantitative analysis for the social sciences using SPSS, one of the most frequently and widely used statistical packages in the world. Students will learn how to enter and manipulate data in SPSS, apply and interpret statistics from descriptive through multiple regression, and test hypotheses using statistical methods. Cross listed with PS-265.

Pre-Requisites
PS-261, SOC-101, SOC-371, or approval of the instructor.

SOC-371. Methods of Research In Sociology

Credits: 3

Introduction to sociological research; selected problems of research in social relations; interviewing techniques; questionnaire design and case studies.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-375. Advanced Criminological Theory

Credits: 3

This course is designed for students currently taking the sociological methods course (SOC371) as part of the sociology and criminology capstone process.  This course investigates the most common criminological theories students are likely to utilize for their own research projects.  Theories are discussed with a focus on the operationalization of concepts of theory into variables that students may find in social science databases. 

Pre-Requisites

SOC-381. Sociological Theory

Credits: 3

The aim of the course is provide the student majoring in sociology, or in one of the related fields, with an historical background necessary for understanding of the current trends in sociology as well as for clarification of its distinct subject matter, problems, and methods.

Pre-Requisites
SOC-101 or approval of the instructor.

SOC-390. Senior Capstone

Credits: 3

This course is intended for senior sociology majors. In this course you will complete an empirical research paper, quantitative or qualitative, and present the results to an audience of faculty and peers.

Pre-Requisites

SOC-399. Cooperative Education

Credits: 1-6

Professional cooperative education placement in a private or public organization related to the student’s academic objectives and career goals. In addition to their work experience, students are required to submit weekly reaction papers and an academic project to a Faculty Coordinator in the student’s discipline. (See the Cooperative Education section of this bulletin for placement procedures.)

Pre-Requisites
Sophomore standing, minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA, consent of academic advisor, and approval of placement by the department chairperson.

SM

SM-201. Introduction to Sports Management

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall,Spring,Summer

This course is an introduction to the field of sport management. The course examines the historical development, current trends, best practices, and future trends of sport management. 

Pre-Requisites
BA-152 or BA-153 with a minimum grade of 2.0.

SM-261. Sport Psychology

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

Sport Psychology course is designed to help students learn the theoretical concepts, research and intervention skills in the psychology of sport and exercise. Students will learn different approaches to understand and evaluate psychological aspects of sport performance. 

Pre-Requisites
SM-201 with a minimum grade of 2.0

SM-325. Sport Marketing

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

Sport Marketing course is designed to provide students with a broad and contemporary overview of the sport marketing field. This course will compare and contrast the field of sport and entertainment marketing with the practices and applications of mainstream marketing.  

Pre-Requisites
SM-201 with a minimum grade of 2.0

SM-341. Sport Finance and Economics

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

Sport Finance and Economics course provides a comprehensive synopsis of the application of financial and economic management used in the sport organization decision making context from both a macro and micro level.

Pre-Requisites
SM-261 or SOC-261  with a minimum grade of 2.0

SM-355. Facility Management

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

Facility Management course is designed to provide students the opportunity to learn multiple aspects of sport facilities and the management of events held at these facilities. Students will gain an understanding of the breadth and complexity of facility planning issues in sport, and the tools necessary to effectively plan and manage sport facilities through hands on, experiential exercises coupled with classroom lectures, discussions, and guest speakers.

Pre-Requisites
SM-201 with a minimum grade of 2.0

SM-461. Capstone in Sport Management

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall,Spring
This capstone class is the final course in the degree sequence for students majoring in Sports Management. Students will review, assess, and apply the concepts they have learned during undergraduate studies through the creation of a customized graduation portfolio.
Pre-Requisites
SM-325 with a minimum grade of 2.0

SM-462. Sports Management Internship

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall,Spring,Summer

This course is designed to help students gain practical, hands on experience in the sport management field. Students will work directly with sport management professionals applying curricular theory and principles to real life situations.

Pre-Requisites
SM-201 with a minimum grade of 2.0

SM-466. Advanced Sports Management Internship

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall,Spring,Summer

This course is designed to help students gain practical, hands on experience in the field of sports. Students will work directly with sport management professionals at a sport organization.

Pre-Requisites
SM-341 with a minimum grade of 2.0

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