Wilkes University

Pre-MBA Studies

Special Programs

Pre-MBA Studies

The Jay S. Sidhu School of Business and Leadership offers a nationally accredited Master of Business Administration program that expands business knowledge, management skills, and leadership capability of current and future professionals from many disciplines, functions, and jobs to enhance their success at work, adding value both for the student and for the organizations with which the student is associated. The program offers advanced training in the functional areas of business and also provides the opportunity for specialization in a selected field through additional training in Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Health Care Administration, Human Resources Management, International Business, Marketing, Operations Management, or Organizational Leadership and Development. An M.B.A. degree is appropriate for students of any academic discipline who would like to receive the analytical and strategic skills they need to step confidently into the business world.

Undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing an M.B.A. degree can register for the Pre-M.B.A. Program during any year of undergraduate study. This program is designed to prepare students with a variety of academic backgrounds for the M.B.A. program. Undergraduate students may use undergraduate required and elective courses to satisfy M.B.A. prerequisite Foundation Courses. These courses, each bearing one credit, represent fundamental business competencies. Up to twelve credits may be waived. This gives students the opportunity to earn an undergraduate degree and an M.B.A. within five and one-half years. Listed below are the Foundation Competencies and the undergraduate course(s) that satisfy each.

Foundation Competency

Undergraduate Course Equivalent(s)

Financial Accounting

ACC-161

Managerial Accounting

ACC-162

Finance

BA 341 or EGM 320

Management

BA 351, PHA 412 orENT-201

Marketing

BA 321

Business Law

BA 233 or 234 or PHA 505

Macroeconomics

EC-101 or [[PHA-509]]

Microeconomics

EC-102

International Business

BA-358

Statistics

BA-319, [[PSY-200]],[[MTH-150]] or [[ENT-321]]

Operations Management

BA 352 or EGM 336

Management Information Systems

BA 257 or ACC-341 or

EGM 321

Students who enter the Pre-M.B.A. program will be counseled by a graduate advisor. Advising sessions are used as an opportunity to prepare students for entrance into the M.B.A. program through communication of student career ambitions and strengths and identification of course scheduling options. It is recommended that entrance into the program occurs within the freshman or sophomore years in order to maximize the number of Foundation Courses that will be waived upon degree completion. Students interested in the Pre-M.B.A. program should contact the Office of Graduate Studies at (570) 408-4235 or graduatestudies@wilkes.edu in order to arrange an appointment with a graduate advisor.

Recommended Course Sequence

Business Administration

BA-119. Data Analysis in Excel

Credits: 1

This course is designed to teach the basic and advanced features and functions of Excel, including summative, descriptive and reporting techniques.  Students will also gain the knowledge of data manipulation and visual reporting. This one-credit class will meet multiple times each week, and will run for 5 consecutive weeks.

BA-151. Integrated Management Experience I

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

Integrated Management Experience is a two-semester sequence that takes you through the entrepreneurial process from creating a business concept to planning the venture to launching and operating the business to harvest and closure of the firm. You learn how businesses plan and operate through the study of functional areas such as marketing, management, human resources, accounting and finance, and operations. Most importantly, you will learn and experience how the pieces fit together through integrating the functional areas tracking information and performance using financial accounting principles. Cross listed with ACC-151 and ENT-151.

BA-152. Integrated Management Experience II

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

Integrated Management Experience is a two-semester sequence that takes you through the entrepreneurial process from creating a business concept to planning the venture to launching and operating the business to harvest and closure of the firm. You learn how businesses plan and operate through the study of functional areas such as marketing, management, human resources, accounting and finance, and operations. You develop a clear understanding of the importance of accounting cycles and how financial accounting principles provide not only information but an integrating thread for all types of organizations. Cross listed with ACC-152 and ENT-152.

Pre-Requisites
ACC/BA/ENT 151.

BA-153. Management Foundations

Credits: 3

Management Foundations provides the framework for further study in accounting, business administration, and entrepreneurship programs. Functional areas of management are examined. This class is closed to freshmen and to any student who completed ACC/BA/ENT 151 and ACC/BA/ENT 152.

BA-319. Business Statistics

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

An introduction to the primary tools of research in business and economics; the collection, summarization, analysis, and interpretation of statistical findings relevant to business decisions. Two hours of lecture and one hour of individualized laboratory. Topics covered will include, but not be limited to, descriptive statistics, probability, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and regression and correlation analysis. Cross-listed with EC-319.

BA-335. Law and Business

Credits: 3

This course provides a foundation for understanding how the law functions; the laws protecting consumers and employees; and the law of contracts, sales, and business organizations.

BA-336. Advanced Topics in Business Law

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

This course provides students with an understanding of select advanced topics in law, specifically those that have the greatest impact on business and accounting.

Pre-Requisites

BA-337. Legal Aspects of Sport and Event Management

Credits: 3

Introduces legal issues that confront contemporary organized athletics and sports management. Specific topics which are highlighted include impact of antitrust laws; personal services contracts; labor law; injury and liability; franchise and transfer rules; and tax aspects. Examines the role of legal services within sports organizations and in individual athlete representation.

Pre-Requisites

BA-419. Quantitative Decision Making

Credits: 3

This course is designed to build on the basics of introductory statistics so that the students understand how a variety of advanced statistical tools are used to support decision-making using business data.  Students develop necessary skills to build models that conform the assumptions of the procedures. The course aims to provide more hands on experience. The topics that will be introduced include descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVA, simple linear regression, multiple linear regression, logistic regression and their applications on business data.

BA-461. Business Strategy and Decision-making

Credits: 3

The first of a two-semester capstone experience. This course integrates the functional areas of business from the perspective of top management. Emphasis is on the role of management in the formation of strategic and long-range plans.

Pre-Requisites

BA-462. Professional Business Experience

Credits: 3
Pre-Requisites

BA-463. The Business Field and Research Experience

Credits: 3

This course allows the student to choose from a variety of professional opportunities. The student could perform research and writing in his or her major area. Such research must be approved by the instructor in advance. (The Undergraduate Thesis) The student may participate in a multidisciplinary capstone course that incorporates the application of business creation, development, and planning. It includes the application of business functions such as management, business strategy, marketing, accounting, finance, operations management, and sales. (The Business Incubator) The student could also visit several local organizations to conduct a live case comparison that spans industries and organizations as it pertains to his or her major area and faculty interests. (The Business Field Experience) Action learning gives students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the Sidhu School disciplines and business practices that are ethically and socially responsible.

Pre-Requisites
Senior class standing.

BA-464. International Business Experience

Credits: 3

The course provides an overview of a Western European Society. A ten-day field trip in Western Europe is a major learning experience of the course. Site visits are made in a number of cities in European countries. Site visits include Cities, Regions, and Business and travel centers. Arrangements for travel are made during the fall, and travel in the spring. The purpose of the course is to create a global learning experience using Western Europe as a medium to facilitate the student’s understanding of the global business environment. Presentations, discussions, travel, observations, projects, as well as written papers will provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding and knowledge.

Accounting

ACC-151. Integrated Management Experience I

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

Integrated Management Experience is a two-semester sequence that takes you through the entrepreneurial process from creating a business concept to planning the venture to launching and operating the business to harvest and closure of the firm. You learn how businesses plan and operate through the study of functional areas such as marketing, management, human resources, accounting and finance, and operations. Most importantly, you will learn and experience how the pieces fit together through integrating the functional areas tracking information and performance using financial accounting principles. Cross listed with ACC-151 and ENT-151.

ACC-152. Integrated Management Experience II

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

Integrated Management Experience is a two-semester sequence that takes you through the entrepreneurial process from creating a business concept to planning the venture to launching and operating the business to harvest and closure of the firm. You learn how businesses plan and operate through the study of functional areas such as marketing, management, human resources, accounting and finance, and operations. You develop a clear understanding of the importance of accounting cycles and how financial accounting principles provide not only information but an integrating thread for all types of organizations. Cross listed with BA-152 and ENT-152.

Pre-Requisites
ACC/BA/ENT 151.

ACC-161. Financial Accounting and Decision-Making

Credits: 3

This is a study of the nature, function, and environment of accounting, including the accounting information system, account analysis, and decision-making. The course provides an understanding of accounting issues and objectives for proper interpretation and analysis of financial accounting information.

ACC-162. Managerial Accounting and Decision-Making

Credits: 3

Managerial accounting is an internal tool used to generate information for managerial planning and control. Students will develop an understanding of operating and capital budgets, standard costs, incremental concepts, relevant costs, transfer pricing, and responsibility and profit center reports as a means of analysis as well as techniques of measurement.

Pre-Requisites

ACC-201. Intermediate Accounting

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

A study of the accounting information system and the accounting standards applicable to corporate balance sheet accounts and their related counterparts that result in revenue and expense recognition on the income statement and statement of retained earnings. Course topics include the financial accounting standards, financial statement preparation, cash and receivables, inventories and cost of goods sold, and plant and depreciation.

Pre-Requisites

ACC-202. Intermediate Accounting II

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

This course is a study of the accounting standards applicable to intangible assets, liabilities, and stockholders’ equity. Also, it focuses on the application of generally accepted accounting principles that relate to various technical reporting areas within financial statements. Emphasis is placed on technical standards and the necessary disclosure requirements for these reporting areas. Course topics include earnings per share, securities that can dilute earnings per share, corporate investments, and accounting for corporate income taxes and pensions.

Pre-Requisites
ACC-201 with a minimum grade of 2.0.

ACC-219. Financial Statement Analysis

Credits: 3

This course will focus on corporate financial reporting, evaluation, financial planning, accounting policies and practices, and other current issues. The interplay between accounting and corporate finance will be emphasized. The course will teach you how to use financial statement information for firm valuation and other economic decisions. The course will also help you understand and analyze the issues that corporate managers face as they design and implement financial reporting strategies, increasing your ability to assess accounting quality. This course will provide you with tools to analyze and exploit information in corporate financial statements.

Pre-Requisites

ACC-301. Advanced Financial Accounting

Credits: 3

A comprehensive review and analysis for various accounting issues relating to corporate consolidations, partnerships, governmental units, non-profit organizations, estates, trusts, and bankruptcies. Extensive computerized applications are an integral part of this course.

Pre-Requisites
ACC-202 with a minimum grade of 2.0.

ACC-311. Advanced Managerial Accounting

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

Advanced treatment of managerial accounting topics with emphasis on generation, communication, and use of information to assist management in performance of the planning and control function. Information systems design, budgeting, variance analysis, and direct costing concepts are covered.

Pre-Requisites

ACC-321. Taxes

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

Introduction to the Internal Revenue Code for individuals and sole-proprietorships. Preparation of individual tax returns based on the current tax law, regulations, and revenue ruling letters. Introduction to tax research using various traditional and electronic reference services.

Pre-Requisites

ACC-322. Advanced Taxes

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

Introduction to certain tax laws as they apply to Corporations, S Corporations, and Partnerships. This involves developing a thorough understanding of tax research and how tax planning may help the financial entity to minimize tax liability.

Pre-Requisites

ACC-331. Auditing

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

To understand the most important concepts in auditing and how they are used in decision making, evidence accumulation and reporting. This entails understanding the concepts, methods, and processes of control that provide for the accuracy and integrity of financial data and the safeguarding of business assets, along with understanding the nature of attest services and the conceptual and procedural bases for performing them.

Pre-Requisites
ACC-202 with a minimum grade of 2.0.

ACC-341. Accounting Information Systems

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

To develop a solid understanding of and appreciation for the use of accounting information employed to process and sort business events so as to provide information for the functions of financial reporting, internal responsibility accounting, and decision support. This understanding includes applications via spreadsheets, databases, general ledgers, and the internet.

Pre-Requisites

ACC-362. Accounting Internship

Credits: three or six
Pre-Requisites

ACC-397. Seminar

Credits: 1-3

One to three credits

Economics

EC-101. Principles of Economics

Credits: 3

Presents basic economic problems and shows how these problems are solved in a free enterprise economy; the effects of the increasing importance of the economic role of government; the nature of national income and the modern theory of determination; how money and backing, fiscal policy, and monetary policy fit in with income analysis and keep the aggregate system working. The course deals mainly with macroeconomic problems.

EC-102. Principles of Economics II

Credits: 3

Based upon a broad microeconomic foundation concentrating on such units as the consumer, the firm, and the industry. A general view of the free market system; the economics of the firm and resource allocation under different market structures; production theory; pricing and employment resources; economic growth and development.

EC-230. Money and Banking

Credits: 3

Three creditsA study of money, credit, and banking operations. Monetary standards, development of the American monetary and banking system. Recent developments in other financial institutions. Central banking and the Federal Reserve System; instruments of monetary control; international monetary relationships. (Cross-listed with BA-230.)

EC-320. The Economics of Crime

Credits: 3

A study of the economic approach to crime and crime prevention. The course will apply economic analysis to such areas of interest as deterring crime, the impact of criminal activity, the allocation of crime-fighting resources, crimes against people, property crime, and victimless crimes. Controversial issues such as the desirability of the death penalty and gun control legislation will be featured.

Pre-Requisites

EC-330. Public Finance

Credits: 3

Fundamental principles of public finance, government expenditures, revenue, financial policies and administration, taxation, principles of shifting and incidence of taxation, public debts and the budget, fiscal problems of federal, state, and local government, the relation of government finance to the economy.

Pre-Requisites
EC-101 and 102.

EC-340. International Trade and Finance

Credits: 3

Classical and Neo-classical theories of trade; qualifications of the pure theory; new theories of trade; the transfer of international payments and the determination of foreign exchange rates; the balance of international payments; tariffs and other trade barriers; United States commercial policy and the General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs; current issues.

Pre-Requisites
EC-101 and 102.

EC-399. Cooperative Education

Credits: 1-6

Professional cooperative education placement in a private or public organization related to the student’s academic objectives and career goals. In addition to their work experience, students are required to submit weekly reaction papers and an academic project to a Faculty Coordinator in the student’s discipline. (See the Cooperative Education section of this bulletin for placement procedures.)

Pre-Requisites
Sophomore standing, minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA, consent of academic advisor, approval of placement by department chairperson.

Engineering Management

EGM-320. Engineering Project Management and Analysis

Credits: 3

Economic analysis of evaluation cash flows over time. Depreciations: techniques and strategies. Replacement analysis, break even analysis, benefit-to-cost ration evaluation. Evaluating a single project: deterministic criteria and techniques. Multiple projects and constraints. Risk analysis and uncertainty. Models of project selection. Project selection using capital asset pricing theory.

Pre-Requisites
Junior standing in engineering.

EGM-321. Quantitative Analysis and Programming Methods

Credits: 3

Discussion of various quantitative analysis and optimization methodologies. Analytical numerical approaches are used in solving linear and nonlinear optimization problems. Emphasizes the development of ability in analyzing problems, solving problems by using software, and post solution analysis.

Pre-Requisites
Junior standing in engineering or consent of the instructor.

EGM-336. Engineering and Management Models

Credits: 3

Discussion of the techniques in and the art of modeling practical problems encountered by engineers and managers.

Pre-Requisites
Junior standing in engineering or consent of the instructor.

EGM-391. Senior Projects I

Credits: 1

Design and development of selected projects in the various fields of engineering under the direction of a staff member. Technical as well as economic factors will be considered in the design. A detailed progress report is required.

Pre-Requisites
Senior standing in engineering, EMG-320

EGM-392. Senior Projects II

Credits: 2

Design and development of selected projects in the field of engineering management under the direction of a staff member. Technical as well as economic factors will be considered in the design. A professional paper to be presented and discussed in an open forum is required.

Pre-Requisites

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