Wilkes University

LPN-BSN Program

LPN-BSN Program

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) students have the opportunity to challenge four specific courses in Nursing by successfully completing examinations from National League for Nursing (NLN) Mobility Examinations. These examinations are used to facilitate the LPN to RN transition.

For details and enrollment information, contact the Chair of the Undergraduate Nursing Department.

License to Practice

Candidates for a license to practice in the health field are required to have "good moral character." The Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing takes into consideration, when deciding on the applications for registration and a license to practice under their jurisdiction, whether candidates have been convicted of any felony or misdemeanor. Candidates are referred to the regulations specified in the Professional Nurse Law (P.L. 317, No. 69).

Biology

BIO-105. The Biological World

Credits: 3

This course presents concepts and modern ideas pertaining to the natural world and the life sciences. Each semester, a selected topic will be addressed and explored from an investigative set of perspectives. While the scientific method will be emphasized in each offering, the range of topics, identified as a subtitle in the course offering data, will include, for example, 1) Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology: Implications for a Changing Society, 2) Human Biology, 3) Contemporary Issues in the Life Sciences, and others. This course is intended for students who are not majoring in science, engineering, pre-pharmacy, and nursing, or pursuing B.S. programs in mathematics or computer science. Fall semesters: Human Biology—two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Dissections of specimens may be required in the laboratory component. Spring semesters: Contemporary Issues in the Life Sciences—three hours of lecture each week.

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BIO-113. Microbiology

Credits: 4

This course presents the basic principles of bacteriology and the relationship of micro-organisms to disease and its prevention, control, and treatment. It considers the effects of microbes within the body and the body’s reaction to them. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, three hours per week. Offered every spring semester.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-115 or permission of the instructor.

BIO-115. Anatomy & Physiology I

Credits: 4
Terms Offered: Fall

This course provides a general study of the human body, its structure and normal function. It provides
an appreciation of the complex nature of the human body with relation to the promotion of a healthy organism. Dissections of specimens are required in the laboratory portion of these courses. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, three hours per week.

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BIO-116. Anatomy & Physiology II

Credits: 4
Terms Offered: Spring

This course is a continuation of BIO-115 and provides a general study of the human body, its structure and normal function. It provides an appreciation of the complex nature of the human body with relation to the promotion of a healthy organism. Dissections of specimens are required in the laboratory portion of these courses. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, three hours per week.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-115 or permission of instructor.

BIO-121. Principles of Modern Biology I

Credits: 4

An introduction to concepts of modern biology for students majoring in biology and other sciences. Topics covered include the origin of life, basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, energetics, reproduction and heredity, molecular genetics, and evolution. Four hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work per week. Offered every fall semester. Required of all Biology majors.

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Co-Requisites

BIO-122. Principles of Modern Biology II

Credits: 4

An introduction to biological diversity and mammalian structure and function for science majors, usually taken as a continuation of BIO-121. Topics include organismal classification, a survey of biological diversity (including characteristics, ecology, phylogenetic relationships, and economic and biomedical uses) of plants, animals, and microbes, and an overview of the mammalian body addressing the form and function of key organ systems. Dissections of specimens are required in the laboratory portion of this course. Four hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered every spring semester. Required of all Biology majors.

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BIO-198. Topics

Credits: 1-3

A study of topics of special interest not extensively treated in regularly offered courses.

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Pre-Requisites
Will vary according to the specific topics course.

BIO-225. Population and Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 4

This course emphasizes the patterns and processes of evolutionary change in living systems in an ecological context. It reviews the basic characteristics and dynamics of populations and the relevance of population ecology and population genetics to the evolution of species. Human evolutions, sociobiology, and other controversial issues are also covered. Laboratory exercises emphasize an experimental approach to more in-depth study of specific topics covered in lecture. Four hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered every fall semester. Required of all Biology majors.

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Pre-Requisites

BIO-226. Cellular and Molecular Biology

Credits: 4

Cell structure in relation to function. Biochemistry and physiology of animal, plant, and bacterial cells and their viruses are presented in a molecular biology context. The cell in division and development. Four hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered every spring semester. Required of all Biology majors.

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Pre-Requisites

BIO-254. Superlab

Credits: 3

Superlab is a research-oriented course in which students carry out laboratory and field-based investigations into research areas such as ecotoxicology, plant physiology, molecular biology, and cancer biology. In this course, students have one hour of classroom instruction per week during the regular semester followed by ten days (over a period of two weeks) of intensive laboratory work after the end of the semester, in which students design and implement experiments and carry out research discussed during the semester with the aid of their instructors. Offered each year.

Pre-Requisites
BIO-225, BIO-226 or BIO-226 as co-requisite.

BIO-298. Topics

Credits: 1-3

A study of topics of special interest not extensively treated in regularly offered courses.

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Pre-Requisites
Will vary according to the specific topics course.

BIO-306. Invertebrate Biology

Credits: 4

This course is a study of the major invertebrate phyla with respect to their taxonomy, evolution, morphology, physiology, and ecology. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121 - BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-311. Comparative Physiology

Credits: 4

Comparative Physiology encompasses the study of organ functions and organ system functions in different animal groups. Emphasis will be on the systemic physiology of vertebrate animals. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered every spring semester. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-312. Parasitology

Credits: 4

Parasitology is the study of organisms that live on or within other organisms and the relationship of these organisms to their hosts. This course deals with the common parasites that infect man and other animals. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-314. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Credits: 4

This course deals with the evolution and anatomy of the organ systems of vertebrates. Lectures survey the comparative anatomy of the vertebrate classes. Laboratory dissections include the lamprey, shark, mud puppy, and cat in detail. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites

BIO-321. Mammalian Physiology

Credits: 4

This course examines the function of mammalian systems with regard to homeostasis, metabolism, growth and reproduction. Normal physiological processes as well as some pathophysiological situations are covered. The emphasis is on human physiology; other mammalian systems, however, are discussed to demonstrate physiological adaptability to various environmental situations. Laboratory exercises include physiological experimentation in living systems and in computer simulations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years. This course satisfies the requirement for a course with an emphasis in quantitative biology.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-323. Functional Histology

Credits: 4

This course emphasizes the microscopic examination of mammalian tissues from morphological and physiological perspectives. Reference is made to organ embryogenesis to support the understanding of organ form and function. Tissue preparation for histological examination is included. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-324. Molecular Biology

Credits: 4

This course will introduce students to modern concepts and techniques in molecular biology through a genuine research experience in using cell and molecular biology to learn about a fundamental problem in biology. Rather than following a set series of lectures, we will study a problem and see where it leads us. We will use the information given in lectures and reading assignments to solve research problems and, in the process, learn a lot of molecular biology. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites

BIO-325. Endocrinology

Credits: 4

This course will focus on the structure, biochemistry, and function of mammalian hormones and endocrine glands, avian, amphibian, and invertebrate hormones will also be discussed, where relevant. Clinical pathologies resulting from excess or insufficient hormones will be discussed, as this is essential to mastering an understanding of Endocrinology. Laboratory exercises include experimentation in living systems and computer simulations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of instructor.

BIO-326. Immunology and Immunochemistry

Credits: 4

This course is concerned with the biologic mechanisms and chemistry of reactants and mediators associated with natural and acquired states of immunity, tissue and blood serum responses to infection and immunization, and related pathophysiologic alternations of hypersensitivity phenomena in vertebrate animals and man. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-327. Medical Microbiology

Credits: 4

Medical Microbiology provides a professional level introduction to microbiology that is focused on application of microbiology to the study of infectious disease etiology and epidemiology. The laboratory covers techniques used in isolation and identification of micro-organisms. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Cross-listed with PHA-327.

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Pre-Requisites

BIO-328. Developmental Biology

Credits: 4

A course dealing with the principles of animal development from descriptive, experimental, and evolutionary perspectives. Laboratory work includes both descriptive and experimental embryology as well as more molecular techniques. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-329. Virology

Credits: 3

Virology provides an introduction to the biology of animal viruses. Description of viral molecular architecture and genome organization is followed by a survey of strategies employed for multiplication and regulation of gene expression. Pathogenesis of viral infections is considered from perspectives of viral reproduction strategies and host defense.

BIO-330. Introduction to Bioinformatics

Credits: 3

An introduction to the ways computers are used to make sense of biological information, especially the data generated by the human genome project. Topics covered include databases and data mining, pair-wise, and multiple sequence alignment, molecular phylogeny, finding genes in raw DNA sequences, predicting protein and RNA secondary and tertiary structures, generating and analyzing microarray data, DNA fingerprinting, rational drug design, metabolic simulation and artificial intelligence. Offered online alternate spring semesters, with one assignment each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a course with an emphasis in quantitative biology.

Pre-Requisites
BIO-225- BIO-226, CHM-231- CHM-232, MTH-150, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-338. Biology of Cancer

Credits: 3

This lecture course is designed to explore the various concepts and mechanisms associated with the origins, elaborations, and future developments in cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Emphasis is placed on the molecular biology and physiology of these processes; therefore, a solid background in basic biology is required. Oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and the disruption of homeostasis are covered in detail, while the medical phenomena typically receive a more general level of coverage.

Pre-Requisites

BIO-340. Conservation Biology

Credits: 3

This course will cover the major topics of conservation biology including an introduction to biodiversity, threats to biodiversity, and solutions to diminish extinctions and population declines. Lecture: three hours per week. Offered each year.

Pre-Requisites
BIO-225- BIO-226 or permission of the instructor.

BIO-341. Freshwater Ecosystems

Credits: 3

A study of the biological and ecological aspects of streams, lakes, and wetlands from a watershed perspective. An initial introduction to physical, chemical, and geological principles of limnology is followed by a focus on freshwater biology. Laboratories include field-based watershed investigations and lake management assessments using geographic information systems techniques. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years. Cross-listed with EES-341.

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Pre-Requisites
EES-211 or EE-240 or BIO-121- BIO-122 or consent of the instructor.

BIO-342. The Archosaurs: Birds, Dinosaurs, and Crocodilians

Credits: 4

This course will cover the biology of the Archosaurs. Major topics include evolutionary history, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology, and conservation of archosaurs. Laboratory is largely field-based with an emphasis on identifying local fauna and population estimation methods. Laboratory also includes dissection, histology, and a field trip to a museum. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-225 or permission of the instructor.

BIO-343. Marine Ecology

Credits: 3

An examination of the biology of marine life within the context of modern ecological principles. The structure and physiology of marine organisms will be studied from the perspectives of adaptation to the ocean as habitat, biological productivity, and interspecific relationships. Emphasis will be placed on life in intertidal zones, estuaries, surface waters, and the deep sea. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years. Cross-listed with EES-343.

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Pre-Requisites
EES-230 and BIO-121- BIO-122. Students must have formal course experiences in oceanography and biology at the science major level or have completed their sophomore year as a biology major.

BIO-344. Ecology

Credits: 4

An examination of contemporary ecological thinking as it pertains to the interrelationships of organisms and their environments. Interactions at the population and community level are emphasized. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years. Cross-listed with EES-344. This course satisfies the requirement for a course with an emphasis in quantitative biology.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122 or permission of the instructor

BIO-345. Genetics

Credits: 4

This course presents a detailed treatment of genetics beyond the introductory level in the areas of both transmission and molecular genetics. Includes discussion of the role of genetics in such areas as developmental medicine. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Offered every fall semester.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-346. Animal Behavior

Credits: 4

Animal Behavior is a course emphasizing behavior as the response of an organism to physical and social environmental change and covering the processes that determine when changes in behavior occur and what form the changes take. Laboratories, using local fauna, demonstrate principles discussed in lecture. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered in alternate years. This course satisfies the requirement for a course with an emphasis in quantitative biology.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-347. Biostatistics and Experimental Design

Credits: 4

This course reviews the statistical paradigms and techniques involved in analyzing biological phenomena. Frequentist and Bayesian methods are employed when appropriate with an emphasis on applied statistics and experimental design. Laboratory exercises include designing, analyzing, and communicating experiments. Computation and computer coding is employed in laboratory exercises. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-225, MTH-150, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-348. Field Zoology

Credits: 3

The goals of this summer course are to introduce field methods of zoology and increase familiarity with Pennsylvania animals. Taxa covered include turtles, snakes, birds, fish, insects, and mammals. Topics covered include conservation issues, population estimation, and sampling methods. Lecture: one hour per week. Laboratory: two hours per week. Offered annually.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-225- BIO-226 or permission of the instructor.

BIO-352. Pathophysiology

Credits: 4

Pathophysiology provides a series of lectures, exercises, and problem-solving sessions integrating the concepts of functional anatomy with human disease. Problem-based learning is encouraged by reviewing illustrative clinical cases and using interactive audio-visual media. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-225- BIO-226 or permission of the instructor.

BIO-361. Plant Form and Function

Credits: 4

An introduction to the morphology, anatomy, cytology, and physiology of vascular plants. Structural and functional aspects of plants are interpreted in relation to each other and within ecological and evolutionary contexts. Offered in a workshop format of two three-hour sessions per week. Offered every fall semester.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-362. Plant Diversity

Credits: 4

A comprehensive survey of algae, bryophytes, and vascular plants emphasizing their structure, reproductive biology, natural history, evolution, and importance to humans. Offered in a workshop format of two three-hour sessions per week. Offered every spring semester.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225- BIO-226, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-366. Field Botany

Credits: 3

A specialized summertime field course that emphasizes a taxonomic, phylogenetic, and ecological survey of vascular plants indigenous to Northeastern Pennsylvania. Course includes field trips to a diverse array of habitats in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Cross-listed with EES-366. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122 or permission of the instructor.

BIO-368. Medical Botany

Credits: 3

A specialized summertime course that provides a scientifically based overview of the ways in which plants affect human health. Topics include cultural and historical perspectives of plants and medicine, plants that treat human ailments, and psychoactive plants. Two hours of lecture per day for five weeks. Offered in alternate years.

Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122, BIO-225, CHM-231- CHM-232, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-369. Plant Pathology

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to modern concepts and techniques in plant physiology through a genuine research experience in using the techniques of plant physiology to learn about a problem in plant biology. Rather than following a set series of lectures, we will study a problem and see where it leads us. We will use the information given in lectures and reading assignments to solve research problems and, in the process, learn a lot of plant physiology. Offered in alternate years.

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Pre-Requisites
BIO-225- BIO-226, CHM-231- CHM-232, or permission of the instructor.

BIO-391. Senior Research I

Credits: 1-2
Terms Offered: Fall

The student will pursue independent research as a member of a team of senior biology majors. Each team
will be responsible for the identification of an original research problem, a thorough literature review of the problem, a detailed prospectus prepared in the format of a grant proposal, complete execution of the research project, a formal oral presentation, and a final manuscript prepared in standard journal format. Senior research is required of all biology majors seeking a four-year degree in Biology. Open only to senior Biology majors.


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Pre-Requisites

Biology major senior standing

BIO-392. Senior Research II

Credits: 1-2
Terms Offered: Spring

The student will pursue independent research as a member of a team of senior biology majors. Each team
will be responsible for the identification of an original research problem, a thorough literature review of the problem, a detailed prospectus prepared in the format of a grant proposal, complete execution of the research project, a formal oral presentation, and a final manuscript prepared in standard journal format. Senior research is required of all biology majors seeking a four-year degree in Biology. Open only to senior Biology majors.


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Pre-Requisites

Biology major senior standing

BIO-394. Biological Field Study

Credits: 1-3
Pre-Requisites
BIO-121- BIO-122 or permission of the instructor.

BIO-397. Professional Preparation Techniques

Credits: 2

Professional Preparation Techniques introduces Biology majors to Biology as a profession. Students learn how to read, write, and analyze research papers and how to make oral presentations and posters using electronic and paper-based supplements. Career development issues, including effective presentation of credentials, are also addressed. Offered every fall and every spring semester.

Pre-Requisites
Junior-level standing.

BIO-398. Topics

Credits: 1-3

A study of topics of special interest not extensively treated in regularly offered courses.

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Pre-Requisites
Will vary according to the specific topics course.

BIO-399. Cooperative Education

Credits: 1-6

Professional cooperative education placement in a private or public organization related to the student’s academic objectives and career goals. In addition to their work experience, students are required to submit weekly reaction papers and an academic project to a Faculty Coordinator in the student’s discipline. See the Cooperative Education section of this bulletin for placement procedures.Requirements: Sophomore standing, 2.0 minimum cumulative GPA, consent of the academic advisor, and approval of placement by the department chairperson.

Psychology

PSY-101. General Psychology

Credits: 3

An introduction to the field of psychology with emphasis on objective and systematic methods of inquiry. Extensive survey of major psychological topics including: biological basis of behavior, sensory systems, learning, cognition, emotions, consciousness, development, stress, personality, social factors and mental health.

PSY-200. Statistics

Credits: 4

An introduction to the use of statistical procedures (by hand and with SPSS) in the analysis of psychological data. Topics include descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. Techniques such as t-tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression will be used for hypothesis testing. 

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101 and Math competency (MTH 101 or higher).

PSY-201. Applied Statistics and Research

Credits: 4

An introduction to how psychological research methods and statistics are used in academic journals and the popular media. The following topics will be discussed: scientific method, research methods used to gather evidence, descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing. Students will be asked to critically review and evaluate research findings.

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101 and Math competency (MTH 101 or higher).

PSY-221. Developmental Psychology

Credits: 3

The course provides a general view of human growth and development from conception through the life span. Physical, cognitive, personal, and social development of the various stages of life will be presented. Discussions will include issues such as the influence of heredity versus environment and how these issues can be studied using various developmental research techniques.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-222. Adolescent Psychology

Credits: 3

This course is designed as a study of the adolescent stage of life. Emphasis will be placed on the following areas of development: physical; emotional; cognitive; and social.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-242. Personality

Credits: 3

An examination of the major theoretical perspectives on personality development and functioning, with additional emphasis on the assessment of personality and research in personality.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-250. Applied Behavior Analysis

Credits: 3

This course will explore the dynamics and management of human behavior. As such, the course will involve exercises with empirical research, statistics, literature searches and analysis with emphasis on the principles emanating from Operant and Pavlovian conditioning phenomena.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-257. Neuropsychology

Credits: 3

A survey of the relationship between nervous system physiology and human behavior with emphasis on neurological disorders, neuropsychological assessment, head injury, cerebral asymmetry, and rehabilitation.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-300. Research Methods

Credits: 4

A lecture and laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with the methods of psychological research. Hands-on experimental participation will give the student direct experience with research design and statistical analyses using SPSS. The student will prepare a formal APA style research proposal to be used for the capstone experience.

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Pre-Requisites
PSY-101 and PSY-200. To be taken by Psychology majors only, during the junior or senior year.

PSY-301. Psychological Research

Credits: 3

An introduction to how psychological research methods and statistics are used in academic journals and the popular media. The following topics will be discussed: scientific method, research methods used to gather evidence, descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing. Students will be asked to critically review and evaluate research findings.

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101 and PSY-200. To be taken by Psychology majors only, during the junior or senior year.

PSY-309. Career Mentoring for the Social Sciences

Credits: 2

This course will offer career guidance for students in the Behavioral and Social Sciences. The course will include topics such as mentoring, networking, résumés and interviewing skills.

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101, junior standing. Course will be cross-listed with PS and SOC-309 Course credits will not count towards minor credits. Open only to majors in the Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSY-311. Behavioral Neuroscience

Credits: 4

A study of the physiological mechanisms mediating behavior and cognition. Emphasis on the structure and function of the nervous system and the neurophysiological bases of sensory processes, emotion, abnormal behavior, sleep, learning and memory, pain, and drug abuse. Laboratory experience includes brain dissection and psychophysiological techniques employed in human behavioral neuroscience research.

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Pre-Requisites
PSY-101; junior or senior standing.

PSY-331. Cognition

Credits: 3

A survey of human cognitive processes such as attention, pattern recognition, memory, language, and problem solving as well as other selected aspects of human cognition. The course includes historical as well as current perspectives on cognitive issues and emphasis on the research techniques used.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-333. Critical Thinking in Psychological Science

Credits: 3

This course provides an opportunity to learn and practice the basic skills of critical thinking within the context of psychological science. Students will evaluate claims and theories in psychology, generate alternative explanations of psychological findings, identify common fallacies in thinking, construct and evaluate arguments, and learn how to become a more intelligent consumer of information. Additional topics include the interface of politics and the media with science and the dangers of pseudoscience.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-341. Introduction to Social Psychology

Credits: 3

An introduction to the study of social behavior from a psychological perspective. Topics include attitude formation and change, conformity, leadership, culture, gender and sexuality, prejudice and discrimination. Cross listed with SOC-341.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-351. Behavioral Medicine

Credits: 3

This course provides a survey of the basic theoretical concepts and major issues in Behavioral Medicine. Specifically, this course examines how the areas of health, illness, and medicine can be studied from a psychological perspective. Topics of emphasis include the following: the psychological aspects of wellness and illness; preventive medicine; stress; chronic and terminal diseases (such as cancer and AIDS); and the use of alternative medicine.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-352. Abnormal Behavior

Credits: 3

A general survey of psychological disorders in children and adults with emphasis on symptomatology, etiology, and assessment. Forensic and classification issues are also examined.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-353. Clinical Methods in Psychology

Credits: 3

A survey of the clinical methods in psychology including general therapeutic models and specific clinical techniques. Issues of assessment and diagnosis of psychological disorders are examined.

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101; PSY-242; PSY-352; junior or senior standing.

PSY-354. The Exceptional Individual

Credits: 3

A study of the psychological, physical, and social challenges and needs of exceptional individuals with an emphasis on etiology, assessment, impact, and educational interventions.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-355. Forensic Psychology

Credits: 3

A survey of the role that psychology has played in the legal system from issues of morality and theories of crime, to eyewitness testimony, the evaluation of criminal suspects, and jury selection. The application of the methods and theories of psychology to the legal system will be emphasized.

Pre-Requisites
PSY-101; junior or senior standing.

PSY-356. Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Credits: 3

A survey of the applied areas of personnel, organizational, human factors, and consumer psychology.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-358. Psychological Tests and Measures

Credits: 3

A survey of the psychometric properties of various instruments and measures of psychological phenomena (especially intelligence and personality). A variety of group and individual tests are studied as to their reliability, validity, and utility.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-359. Psychopharmacology

Credits: 3

A study of the effects and mechanisms of the action of psychoactive drugs on behavior. Focus will be placed on drugs used to treat psychopathological disorders and drugs of abuse. Topics of emphasis include a survey or stimulants, depressants, antipsychotics, antidepressants, psychedelics, and legal drugs, such as caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-362. History of Psychology

Credits: 3

A study of the philosophic and scientific roots of contemporary psychology, with emphasis on the applicability of past questions and knowledge to current psychological thought.

Pre-Requisites

PSY-399. Cooperative Education

Credits: 1-3

Professional cooperative education placement in a private or public organization related to the student’s academic objectives and career goals. In addition to their work experience, students are required to submit weekly reaction papers and an academic project to a Faculty Coordinator in the student’s discipline. (See the Cooperative Education section of this bulletin for placement procedures.)

Pre-Requisites
Sophomore standing, minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA, consent of academic advisor, and approval of placement by the department chairperson.

PSY-400. Research Capstone

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide a research-based capstone experience for senior Psychology majors. Students will run an experiment, conduct the appropriate statistical analysis, and present the results formally in an APA manuscript, a poster, and in an oral presentation.

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Pre-Requisites
PSY-101; PSY-200; PSY-300; Senior status and departmental permission.

PSY-401. Applied Capstone

Credits: 4

This course will offer a professional capstone experience, including a required internship experience. Students will prepare client case presentations based upon their observations during their internship. An internship is required prior to taking PSY 401 (PSY 399) and a second internship is required for this course, which is counted with the four credit requirement.

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Pre-Requisites
PSY-101; PSY-201 or PSY-301; PSY-399; Senior status.

Nursing

NSG-117. Basic Life Support Renewal

Credits: 1

This hybrid course combines online learning and cognitive evaluation with hands-on skills practice and psychomotor evaluation in accordance with the standards of the American Heart Association's (AHA) Core Curriculum for renewal. Students who successfully complete this course will receive renewal of AHA course completion cards for both Basic Cardiac Life Support for the Heath Care Provider and Heartsaver First Aid.

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NSG-200. Principles of Normal Nutrition

Credits: 3

An introduction of the basic science of human nutrition: principles of normal nutrition, meal planning, computation of diets, physiological, psychosocial, and social effects of food and its constituents; and some local, national, and international nutrition problems.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-210. Principles of Nursing: Individual, Family, and Community

Credits: 6

This course introduces the student to the profession of nursing. Use of the nursing process is emphasized in meeting the basic human needs of clients within families and their communities. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice in the Clinical Nursing Simulation Center and selected clinical agencies. Hours weekly: 4 hours of class and 6 hours of clinical practice.\

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Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-211. Physical Assessment

Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate the integration of physical assessment skills as an essential element of the nursing process. The components of physical assessment, including the health history and physical examination, are organized to allow the student to proceed from an assessment of the overall function of a client to the more specific functions of each body system.Requirement: Sophomore standing in the Nursing program and Accelerated Baccalaureate Program for Second Degree Students.

Co-Requisites

NSG-213. Nursing Care of the Psychiatric Mental Health Client: Individual, Family, and Community

Credits: 4

The nursing process is utilized in assisting adults and their families within their communities to achieve optimum health and to resolve selected problems in mental health. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice in a variety of health care settings. Hours weekly: 2 hours of class, 6 hours of clinical practice.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-214. Pathophysiology for the Professional Nurse

Credits: 3

This course focuses on altered cell functioning resulting in deviations from homeostasis. Topics of study include principles of homeostasis and the immune, cardiopulmonary, renal, nervous, gastrointestinal, hematological, musculoskeletal, and endocrine systems. The student’s ability to relate this to the individual’s need for care is emphasized. Pathological alterations in health at the systems level and implications for nursing care are emphasized.Requirement: Sophomore standing in the Nursing program.

Co-Requisites

NSG-215. Pharmacotherapeutics I

Credits: 1

Principles of pharmacology and specific drug groups are explored. An emphasis is placed on pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, and  pharmacodynamics.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-217. Basic Life Support Renewal

Credits: 1

This hybrid course combines online learning and cognitive evaluation with hands-on skills practice and psychomotor evaluation in accordance with the standards of the American Heart Association's (AHA) Core Curriculum for renewal. Students who successfully complete this course will receive renewal of AHA course completion cards for both Basic Cardiac Life Support for the Heath Care Provider and Heartsaver First Aid.

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NSG-224. Pharmacotherapeutics and Clinical Decision-Making in Nursing

Credits: 3

For Accelerated Bachelors Program students only. This course is designed to assist students to understand the multidisciplinary science of pharmacology based on human systems. Content includes drug classifications, indications, adverse effects and contraindications, age-related variables, dosages, and nursing implications. Using critical thinking skills related to drug therapy, clinical decision-making is developed.

Pre-Requisites
Acceptance into the Accelerated Bachelors Program.
Co-Requisites

NSG-235. Medical Surgical Nursing I

Credits: 6

The nursing process is utilized in assisting adults and their families within their communities to achieve optimum health and managed selected health problems. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice in a variety of health care settings.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-236. Pharmacotherapeutics II

Credits: 1

This course is designed to assist students to understand the multidisciplinary science of pharmacology based on human systems.  Content includes drug classification, indications, adverse effects and contraindications, age-related variables, dosages, and nursing implications.  Using critical thinking skills related to drug therapy, clinical decision making is developed.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-237. Medical Surgical Nursing II

Credits: 6

The nursing process is utilized in assisting adults and their families within their communities to achieve optimum health and manage selected health problems. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice in a variety of health care settings.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-238. Pharmacotherapeutics III

Credits: 1

This course is designed to assist students to understand the multidisciplinary science of pharmacology based on human systems.  Content includes drug classification, indications, adverse effects and contraindications, age-related variables, dosages, and nursing implications.  Using critical thinking skills related to drug therapy, clinical decision making is developed.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-239. Gerontological Nursing

Credits: 2

This course will focus on the nursing management of older adults. Contemporary theories of gerontology, theories of aging, physiological / psychological functioning, impact of developmental changes, illness, and dysfunction will be emphasized. The geriatric patient will be examined at various levels – healthy older adult, older adult at risk, the older adult experiencing acute and chronic illness.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-241. Nursing Care of the Child Bearing Family

Credits: 4

The nursing process is utilized in childbearing families within their communities to meet their human needs. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice in a variety of health care settings. This course is designated for Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS).

 

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-242. Nursing Care of the Child Rearing Family

Credits: 4

The nursing process is utilized in assisting families with children within the communities to meet their human needs. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice in a variety of health care settings.

 

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-270. Recent Trends in Clinical Nutrition

Credits: 3

This elective course is an introduction to diet therapy, with a discussion of the contemporary issues in clinical nutrition. The course deals with popular myths about nutrition and health and substantiates or refutes these claims with research evidence.

Pre-Requisites
NSG-200 or RN status.

NSG-274. Dimensions in Health and Wellness

Credits: 3

This elective course provides a framework for the exploration of the concepts of holistic health, wellness, and alternative health care modalities through experiential exercises, reading, journaling, and lectures. During the course, the student will assess his or her personal health and wellness status, develop a plan to modify a specified health behavior, implement the plan using a variety of holistic modalities, and evaluate the outcome of the plan. This is a wellness elective appropriate for any student at any level. Lecture, discussion, class participation. No prerequisites. No co-requisites. No fees.

NSG-290. Transition to Baccalaureate Nursing

Credits: 7

This course is designed to facilitate the transition of RN students from other educational routes to baccalaureate education and professional nursing practice. The course focuses on the integration of knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the development of the professional role to enhance quality outcomes for individuals, families, and populations across all healthcare settings and in complex healthcare environments.

NSG-299. Nursing Forum

Credits: 7
Pre-Requisites
RN status or NCLEX eligibility, ENG-101.Co-requisite NSG-200 or fulfillment of course requirements by means of a challenge exam.

NSG-317. Advanced Life Support

Credits: 3

This course covers the essential material for Advanced Cardiac Life Support and Pediatric Advanced Life Support in accordance with the standards of the American Heart Association. Enrolled students are eligible for American Heart Association ACLS and PALS Course Completion Cards at the end of the course.

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NSG-321. Population Health

Credits: 3

This course provides a foundation in population health, including community and population assessment, intervention, and evaluation of culturally diverse and vulnerable populations.



Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-325. Preparation for Professional Practice

Credits: 2

This course uses a variety of strategies to prepare final semester pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing students for entry into professional nursing practice. Students are assessed for readiness to sit for the NCLEX-RN licensure examination as well as for entry into professional nursing practice in a general health care setting. This course provides students with quantitative analysis of their readiness to pass the NCLEX-RN exam

 



Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-330. Nursing Practice I

Credits: 12

(Accelerated Baccalaureate Program for Second Degree Students)This course introduces the student to the profession of nursing. Use of the nursing process is emphasized in meeting the human needs of clients identified as individuals, families, and communities. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice in the Clinical Nursing Simulation Center and selected clinical agencies. 12 hours of clinical practice.

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Co-Requisites

NSG-331. Nursing Practice II

Credits: 12

(Accelerated Baccalaureate Program for Second Degree Students)Building on the foundation of Nursing, the nursing process is used to assist individuals, families, and communities to achieve optimum health and to resolve selected medical, surgical, and mental health problems. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice, and clinical skills will be learned in the Clinical Nursing Simulation Center (CNSC) and mastered in a variety of settings. Hours weekly: 7 hours of class; 15 hours of clinical practice.

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Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-332. Nursing Practice III

Credits: 12

(Accelerated Baccalaureate Program for Second Degree Students)This course prepares the student for professional role development in emerging health care delivery systems. The nursing process is utilized in assisting individuals, families, and communities to meet their health needs. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice in a variety of health care settings. Hours weekly: 6 hours of class; 18 hours of clinical practice.

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Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-340. Advanced Care Concepts

Credits: 5

The nursing process is used in assisting adults and their families, within their communities, to achieve optimum health and to resolve complex health problems. Hours weekly: 2 hours of class, 12 hours of clinical practice.

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Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-341. Nursing Informatics

Credits: 3

This course provides information about technology used to communicate, manage information, and support decision making to facilitate the achievement of client healthcare outcomes. The course integrates information related to the areas of nursing science, information management science, and computer science.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-342. Introduction to Nursing Research

Credits: 3

The research process is examined in this course. Emphasis is placed on studies in nursing that provide a foundation for critical reflection on research reports and application of findings to practice. Designated oral presentation option (OPO). Offered in the fall semester only.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-345. Senior Practicum

Credits: 5

This course prepares the student for professional role development in emerging health care delivery systems. The nursing process is utilized in the care of older adult clients and their families within their communities in a variety of settings. Nursing theory is correlated with clinical practice. Hours weekly: 2 hours of class, 19 hours of clinical practice.

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Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-346. Contemporary Issues and Trends In Nursing

Credits: 3

This seminar course explores current issues and trends in nursing and health care. Designated oral presentation option (OPO).

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

NSG-347. Leadership and Management Practicum

Credits: 3

This course prepares the RN to BSN or RN to MSN student for professional role development in emerging health care delivery systems. The student synthesizes knowledge from previous nursing and supportive courses to manage care in an area of clinical practice consistent with career goals.

NSG-348. Baccalaureate Capstone

Credits: 3

This course is intended to integrate learning in the RN to BSN curriculum through the identification of a clinical problem and the review of evidence-based solutions.

NSG-394. Nursing Elective or Core Requirement

Credits: 3

This elective course focuses on the implementation of the nursing process in the care of vulnerable populations within the community setting through a service learning approach.

NSG-399. Cooperative Education

Credits: 1-6

Professional cooperative education placement in a private or public organization related to the student’s academic objectives and career goals. In addition to their work experience, students are required to submit weekly reaction papers and an academic project to a Faculty Coordinator in the student’s discipline. See the Cooperative Education section of this bulletin for placement procedures.Requirements: Sophomore standing; minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA; consent of the academic advisor; and approval of placement by the School dean.


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